Is mirin halal? Genuine mirin is not, so use a substitute

                by Joost Nusselder | Updated:  September 19, 2021

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Mirin is made from fermented rice and is frequently used as a cooking wine in Japanese dishes. If you are Muslim, you may be wondering if mirin is permissible to consume.

Is mirin halal? Genuine mirin is not, so use a substitute

Mirin is an alcoholic ingredient, so it is not considered halal in the Islamic faith.

This article discusses mirin, whether or not mirin is halal and why, and substitutes you can use for mirin.

What does halal food mean?

For food to be considered halal, it must adhere to Islamic law based on the Koran. All alcohol is considered haram, which means forbidden. Even just a sip of something that contains alcohol is haram.

Food that is considered haram does not follow the rules and laws of the Koran.

All pork is considered haram as well as meat that did not come from a healthy animal or came from an unacceptable part of an animal.

Is mirin halal?

Since mirin is alcohol that is made through a wine-making process, it is not halal.

Mirin is a cooking rice wine that contains between 10 and 14 percent alcohol. Pure mirin is drinkable as an alcoholic beverage.

Any ingredient that contains more than .05 percent alcohol is considered haram. Even fruit that has been fermented is not halal because of the alcohol created through the fermentation process.

Is mirin halal after it is cooked?

Cooking with mirin is also considered haram. In Islamic law, removing alcohol does not change the fact that mirin is an alcoholic ingredient.

So even though cooking with mirin causes the alcohol to evaporate, it is still haram.

Can I cook with mirin or other rice wine as a Muslim?

No, cooking with mirin or other rice wines is considered haram in the Islamic faith. Since mirin contains alcohol, it cannot be halal, even if the alcohol gets cooked off.

It is forbidden to consume any alcoholic ingredient, even once the alcohol is removed from it.

What is a halal substitute for mirin?

Honteri mirin is mirin that does not contain alcohol, which means it is considered halal in the Islamic faith.

If you are unable to find Honteri mirin, you can make your own substitute for mirin by combining sugar and water.

Conclusion

Mirin is used as an ingredient in authentic Japanese cuisine. However, since it is a rice wine, it contains alcohol. This means that mirin and food cooked with mirin is haram, or forbidden, in the Islamic faith.

If you are looking to cook with mirin but do not want to sin against your faith, Honteri mirin is mirin that does not contain alcohol.

Wondering if takoyaki is halal? Find out here!

Ever had trouble finding Japanese recipes that were easy to make?

We now have "cooking Japanese with ease", our full recipe book and video course with step-by-step tutorials on your favorite recipes.

Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.