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Pork tocino

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Pork tocino, or Filipino sweet cured pork, is a native breakfast dish well-loved by many Filipino families. It’s made out of pork cuts, soy sauce, sugar, black paper, and flavorings.

The process of cooking the dish is very simple, but curing meat will take time. Tocino is also one of the main ingredients of tocilog, a Filipino breakfast staple made with tocino, fried rice (sinangag), and eggs (itlog).

The sweet and salty taste of tocino and the warmth it gives early in the morning are enough to give your day a boost! So the next time you’re having a bad morning, have tocino for breakfast.

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Origin of pork tocino

The Filipino dish tocino is native to the Philippines, but its origin can be traced back to the Spanish. “Tocino” literally means “bacon”, or formerly referred to as cured pork from the back of the hog.

And since we already know about the Spaniards’ influence on the Philippines from having colonized it for 333 years, then the passing of food recipes and names should be no surprise.

The preparation of the tocino recipe was then improvised by early Filipino chefs to suit the Filipinos’ love for sweet and salty dishes, especially for hearty breakfast meals.

Check out our new cookbook

Bitemybun's family recipes with complete meal planner and recipe guide.

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Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.