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Biscocho

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Biscocho is also known as biskotso. It’s a type of biscuit that’s been popular in the Philippines since the Spanish colonial era. The name “biscocho” comes from the Spanish word “bizcocho”.

Traditionally, the bread is double-baked to make it very dry. It’s supposed to be very crispy with a delicious buttery flavor.

Biscocho is made with flour, sugar, eggs, baking powder, and butter or margarine. Instead of an exclusively long strip shape like biscotti, the Filipino biscocho is made with long, oval, or square bread slices.

Basically, stale bread slices like monay, ensaymada, or pandesal are generously covered in a butter and sugar creamy mixture, just like in this recipe.

Since biscocho is one of the most popular recipes for simple snack foods, people are most familiar with the classic buttery sweet taste.

The buttery biscocho is the perfect snack to go with coffee, tea, or hot chocolate, and it’s super delicious!

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Origin

In the Philippines, Biscocho is typically associated with the Visayan province of Ilo-Ilo, where the bread is baked, then topped with butter or margarine, sugar, and garlic (which is optional).

However, because of the mobility of Filipinos, this biscocho recipe has been brought over to the country’s different regions.

The origin of biscocho traces back to Spain where it’s a type of Spanish biscuit. It’s said to have been introduced to the Philippines during the Spanish colonial era between the 16th and 19th centuries.

The Spanish version is a bit different from the Filipino version because of the addition of anise seeds, which give the biscuits a unique flavor. The popular Spanish biscocho is also baked twice like the Filipino counterpart, and sometimes even thrice, to make it extra dry and crispy.

Since then, the recipe has been adopted and adapted by Filipinos to create the biscocho that we have today!

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Bitemybun's family recipes with complete meal planner and recipe guide.

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Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.