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Kwek-kwek

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Kwek kwek is a popular Filipino street food made of deep-fried quail eggs. They’re also called “orange” eggs as a result of the food coloring in the batter.

Basically, the eggs are covered in a batter colored with orange food coloring. The batter is made from annatto powder, flour, orange food coloring, and water. Each boiled egg is deep-fried until the batter becomes crispy and crunchy.

Kwek-kwek is a similar Pinoy street food to its sister dish called tokneneng, which is the same dish but made with chicken eggs or duck eggs.

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Origin

There’s no real evidence of who was the first to invent this local delicacy. But there’s a local legend about the origins of this egg dish.

Apparently, kwek-kwek was invented by accident. A balut vendor in Quezon City (Cubao), Philippines dropped her food products.

Balut (fertilized duck egg) was quite expensive and she didn’t want to waste the eggs. So the vendor peeled the shells off, put them through the flour, and then dried them.

I’m not sure when frying was added to the recipe, but I can’t imagine not having that crispy crust!

It’s supposedly the precursor dish to what we now know as kwek-kwek. But it soon became a favorite food in many households, especially during street festivals and celebrations.

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Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.