Teba Shio (Salted Sake Chicken Wings) Recipe Izakaya-Style

by Joost Nusselder | Updated:  November 1, 2022

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Who doesn’t love chicken wings? The good news is the Japanese have mastered the art of cooking the best salty wings in the oven.

But have you ever tried salted chicken wings? If you haven’t, you are definitely missing out!

Salted chicken wings are a delicious combination of crispy chicken wings and savory salt.

Teba Shio (Salted Sake Chicken Wings) Recipe Izakaya-Style
Favorite Asian Recipes
Favorite Asian Recipes

They taste great as a snack or appetizer, and they’re perfect for serving at parties or get-togethers.

These Teba Shio chicken wings (手羽塩) are oven-broiled to juicy, crisp, and golden perfection.

They’re made with three basic ingredients: chicken wings, sake, and salt! The wings are a common menu item at izakayas and tapas-style restaurants.

Make your own Japanese salted chicken wings at home

Chicken wings are easily lovable by a lot of people. By marinating it with sake, you will elevate the savory taste of the flavor with an ultimate umami kick.

The cooking sake also tenderizes the meat and gives it a nice color. Teba Shio is the perfect dish to enjoy during a casual party or get-together with friends.

It’s easy and quick to make, but it will surely impress even picky eaters.

These wings will be a staple at all your gatherings, game days, and weekend dinners since they are so delicious.

So keep reading to find out the recipe and learn how to make them extra crispy.

Teba Shio: Japanese Salted Sake Chicken Wings

Joost Nusselder
In this Japanese recipe, the chicken wings are salty and full of flavor. The wings are oven-broiled until they become crispy on the outside but tender on the inside. To make it taste even more perfect, you can add some spices to the dish, like Japanese seven-spice.
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Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Course Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine Japanese
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 15 pieces chicken wings flats or winglets
  • cups sake
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper powder
  • 1 piece of lemon
  • 2 tbsp apanese seven spice Shichimi togarashi

Instructions
 

  • Soak the chicken in a bowl of sake for 15 minutes.
  • Pat dry each piece of wings.
  • Sprinkle the chicken with salt and black pepper on both sides. Place on a tray lined with aluminum foil. Place the chicken skin down.
  • The wings should be broiled on high heat. Before cooking, preheat the oven's broiler to high (550°F/288°C) for 3 minutes.
  • The baking sheet should be placed on the middle oven rack, about 8" from the heating source. Cook the chicken on the skin side for about 8-10 minutes and an additional 9 to 10 minutes after flipping it over or until it is well browned and crispy.
  • Take the tray out of the oven and sprinkle the chicken with Seven Spice and lemon juice.

Notes

Note: if your oven doesn’t have a broiler, you can roast the chicken wings on medium-high heat for approximately 45 minutes, turning them over at least once, so they get crispy.
Keyword Chicken
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Cooking tips

The kind of chicken wings you buy really does make a difference for this recipe. Always use fresh organic chicken (if possible) or if not, make sure the wings are meaty.

Marinating the chicken in sake is also very important.

You should place the wings in a large bowl with 1.5 cups of sake and let them absorb the flavor for at least 15 minutes.

Don’t try to use substitutions for this recipe. Sake aids in getting rid of the gamey flavor of the chicken.

When the chicken is merely seasoned with salt and pepper, this is very noticeable.

A good quality cooking sake like Kikkoman Ryorishi has a balanced taste.

Here’s an important tip: before baking, firmly pat dry each wing with a paper towel. The crispy skin will not be achieved if there’s too much sake left on the meat.

To add more flavor to the wings, try marinating them with extra spices like sesame seeds, garlic powder, or ginger.

It’s important that you broil the chicken wings in the oven. Simply roasting them does not make them quite so crispy.

If you want to try a different approach, you can always grill the chicken wings or smoke them in a smoker.

Substitutes and variations

Teba shio is one of those recipes that can’t be varied, and you can’t use too many substitute ingredients.

What you can decide on, though, is whether you want to use a whole wing or the flat part/winglets.

The seasonings are very basic: salt and maybe a bit of black pepper.

As for the sake, it’s absolutely necessary because it tenderizes the meat and gives it a nice color and flavor.

When it comes to salt, some people like to use shichimi Negi salt, which is a combination of sea salt and Japanese seven-spice.

You can also experiment with other types of salt, like Himalayan pink salt, regular sea salt, or black salt.

If you want to add more flavor, consider drizzling a little bit of soy sauce over the chicken once it is fully cooked. This makes the skin less crispy, though!

How to serve and eat

Teba Shia is supposed to be finger food, so you can serve it with toothpicks or small forks. Well, you can actually just eat them with your fingers.

Before serving, you can add a lemon wedge and shichimi togarashi.

Enjoy Teba Shio chicken wings with your favorite dipping sauce, like soy sauce and wasabi paste, or simply as they are.

You can also enjoy them with other appetizers and finger foods, like vegetable sticks, chips, or fries.

As for drinks, these salty chicken wings are usually served with sake, wine, soda, or even sparkling water.

How to store

Teba Shio chicken wings can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

You can also keep them in the freezer for about a month.

When reheating, be sure to place the wings on a baking tray and bake at 350°F for about 20 minutes or until they are heated through.

Similar dishes

There are many ways to cook chicken wings.

Of course, grilled and smoked chicken wings are also very popular, as well as chicken wings battered in tempura, fried chicken wings coated in sesame seeds or chili powder and mango glaze.

Sticky teriyaki chicken wings are very popular as well, and they can be made with honey or sweet chili sauce.

You can also try our Buffalo chicken wings recipe if you like your wings saucy.

If you want to try something a little different, check out crispy fried chicken drumsticks or Korean-style sticky chicken wings.

These delicious and flavorful wings are sure to be a hit at any party or gathering!

Takeaway

If you are looking for an easy and delicious recipe for chicken wings, look no further than Teba Shio.

This Japanese-inspired dish combines savory and salty flavors with a touch of crispiness for the perfect appetizer or snack.

Broiling chicken wings makes the skin very crispy, and the simple salt and sake combination is perfectly balanced.

Whether you are serving Teba Shio chicken wings as an appetizer or a main dish, they are sure to be a hit with your friends and family.

So why not try this recipe today?

Rather have your chicken sweet and creamy? Try this Filipino pininyahang manok (pineapple chicken) recipe

Check out our new cookbook

Bitemybun's family recipes with complete meal planner and recipe guide.

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Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.