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Chinese Cuisine: Discover the Rich History and Regional Dishes

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What is Chinese cuisine? Chinese cuisine is a way of life, isn’t it?

Chinese cuisine is characterized by its diversity of flavors and ingredients. Many dishes are flavored with soy sauce, rice wine, and sesame oil, and include garlic, ginger, and scallions. Some popular dishes include Peking duck, sweet and sour pork, and Kung Pao chicken.

In this guide, I’ll tell you everything you need to know about Chinese cuisine, from the history to the different regional varieties. Plus, I’ll share some tips on how to cook it yourself.

What is chinese cuisine

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The Roots of Chinese Cuisine: A Journey Through Time

Chinese cuisine has a rich and fascinating history that dates back thousands of years. The actual discovery of rice, which is now a staple food in Chinese cuisine, is believed to have started around 5000 BCE in the upper Yangtze River area. The Chinese people have been able to produce a variety of dishes using rice and other products commonly found in their environment. The legendary female ruler, Fu Xi, is said to have played a crucial role in the development of Chinese cuisine by introducing the use of fire and cooking methods such as boiling and drying.

The Influence of Religion and Philosophy

Chinese cuisine is closely associated with Chinese philosophy and religion. According to Chinese tradition, food is not just a means of sustenance but also an art and a religious practice. The preparation, storage, and serving of food are all marked by religious and philosophical beliefs. For example, vegetarian dishes are highly popular in Chinese cuisine, especially among Buddhist monks. The use of red and white onions is also a crucial element in Chinese cooking, as they are believed to have religious significance.

The Evolution of Chinese Cuisine

Over time, Chinese cuisine has evolved and expanded to include a wide variety of dishes and cooking techniques. The cuisine is divided into eight main regional groups, each with its own unique dishes and flavors. Some of the famous dishes in Chinese cuisine include Peking duck, Kung Pao chicken, and hot and sour soup. Chinese cuisine is also known for its use of soy sauce, which is sold in stands all over the world. The list of ingredients used in Chinese cuisine comprises a wide variety of vegetables, meats, and seafood.

The Flavors of China: Exploring Regional Cuisines

Sichuan cuisine is known for its bold flavors and liberal use of chili peppers. Some of the most popular dishes include:

  • Kung Pao Chicken: a spicy stir-fry dish featuring diced chicken, peanuts, and vegetables in a spicy sauce.
  • Mapo Tofu: a spicy tofu dish made with ground pork, Sichuan peppercorns, and chili bean paste.
  • Hot Pot: a communal dish where diners cook a variety of meats, seafood, and vegetables in a spicy broth at the table.

Hunan Cuisine: Hot and Sour

Hunan cuisine is similar to Sichuan cuisine in its use of chili peppers, but it also incorporates a lot of sour flavors. Some of the most popular dishes include:

  • Chairman Mao’s Red-Braised Pork: a dish featuring chunks of pork belly braised in soy sauce, sugar, and spices until the meat is tender and the sauce is thick and sticky.
  • Steamed Fish with Chili and Fermented Black Beans: a delicate dish featuring fresh fish steamed with a spicy sauce made from chili peppers, ginger, garlic, and fermented black beans.
  • Spicy Pickled Cabbage: a side dish made by pickling chopped cabbage with chili peppers, ginger, and garlic.

Cantonese Cuisine: Delicate and Balanced

Cantonese cuisine is known for its delicate flavors and emphasis on fresh ingredients. Some of the most popular dishes include:

  • Dim Sum: a type of meal featuring small, bite-sized dishes served in bamboo steamers, including dumplings, steamed buns, and rice noodle rolls.
  • Roast Duck: a dish featuring a whole duck that has been marinated, air-dried, and roasted until the skin is crispy and the meat is tender.
  • Sweet and Sour Pork: a dish featuring chunks of pork that have been battered and fried, then served with a sweet and sour sauce made from sugar, vinegar, and ketchup.

Shandong Cuisine: Seafood and Meat

Shandong cuisine is known for its variety of seafood and meat dishes. Some of the most popular dishes include:

  • Braised Abalone: a dish featuring fresh abalone that has been braised in soy sauce, sugar, and spices until it is tender and flavorful.
  • Dezhou Braised Chicken: a dish featuring a whole chicken that has been marinated in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar, and spices, then braised until the meat is tender and the skin is crispy.
  • Scallion Pancakes: a type of flatbread made by mixing chopped scallions into a dough, then rolling it out and frying it until it is crispy and golden brown.

Other Regional Cuisines

China has a wide variety of regional cuisines, each with its own unique flavors and dishes. Some additional regional cuisines to try include:

  • Beijing Cuisine: known for its emphasis on imperial cuisine and dishes featuring duck.
  • Fujian Cuisine: known for its seafood dishes and delicate flavors.
  • Yunnan Cuisine: known for its use of fresh herbs and spices, as well as its variety of ethnic minority dishes.
  • Xinjiang Cuisine: known for its heavy use of lamb and beef, as well as its influence from Central Asian and Middle Eastern cuisines.

No matter which regional cuisine you try, you’ll notice that Chinese cooking techniques play a key role in delivering delicious and balanced flavors. Some additional tips to help you enjoy Chinese cuisine to the fullest include:

  • Try a variety of dishes to get a sense of the different flavors and ingredients used in Chinese cooking.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for recommendations or explanations of dishes you’re not familiar with.
  • Keep in mind that storage and preparation methods may be different than what you’re used to, so be open to trying new things.
  • Enjoy the natural flavors of fresh ingredients, and don’t be afraid to add a little spice or sauce to enhance the dish.
  • Practice good dining etiquette, such as using chopsticks and serving dishes family-style.
  • And most importantly, have fun and enjoy the ultimate foodie adventure that is Chinese cuisine!

The Variety of Courses in Chinese Cuisine

Chinese cuisine is primarily known for its staple food, rice. According to the Chinese people, rice is the main food and is eaten with almost every meal. White rice is commonly served, but there are also different types of rice such as glutinous rice, yellow rice, and even rice noodles. Meat is also a primary staple in Chinese cuisine, with pork being the most commonly consumed meat.

Types of Courses

Chinese cuisine is famous for its different cooking styles and techniques. The food is commonly prepared using steamed, dry, or fresh methods. Seafood is also a popular ingredient in Chinese cuisine, with dishes like steamed fish being a steady supply in many local restaurants. The different types of courses in Chinese cuisine include:

  • Main dishes: These are the primary dishes that are served with rice or noodles. They can be prepared using a variety of ingredients and cooking methods, and are classified according to their local style of preparation. Some famous regional cuisines include Sichuan, Fujian, Jiangsu, Hunan, Shandong, Zhejiang, and Anhui.
  • Soups: Chinese soups come in a variety of textures and flavours. They are usually served as a starter or as a side dish.
  • Noodles: Noodles are a common food in Chinese cuisine and come in different shapes and sizes. They can be prepared using wheat or rice flour and are commonly served in soups or stir-fried.
  • Vegetables: Chinese cuisine incorporates a wide variety of vegetables, both fresh and cooked. Leafy greens like bok choy and Chinese broccoli are commonly used in stir-fries and soups.
  • Dim sum: These are small dishes that are usually served with tea. They come in a variety of shapes and textures and are a popular food in Cantonese cuisine.

Differences in Preparation

The preparation of Chinese cuisine varies widely depending on the region and the availability of ingredients. Traditional methods of cooking are still followed in many areas, but new techniques and materials are also being incorporated. Chefs in China are known for their unique style of preparing food, and many dishes have names given to them according to the method of preparation. For example, hot pot is a popular method of cooking food in China where ingredients are cooked in a pot of hot broth at the table.

One special type of food preparation in Chinese cuisine is the use of a bamboo leaf to wrap food before steaming or boiling. This is a common method used in the southern regions of China. Another difference in preparation is the use of grains other than rice, such as wheat, which is commonly used in northern regions along the Yellow River.

Discover the Eight Culinary Cuisines of Chinese Dishes

Chinese cuisine is widely loved and known for its fiery, spicy, and sweet flavors. The country has a wide variety of dishes that differ in taste, preparation, and ingredients. These eight culinary cuisines are Anhui, Cantonese, Fujian, Hunan, Jiangsu, Shandong, Szechuan, and Zhejiang. Each cuisine has its own unique features, and some are more popular than others. Here are some of the most prominent Chinese cuisines:

  • Cantonese cuisine is widely loved and considered a staple in Chinese cuisine. It originated from the Guangdong province and is known for its delicate flavors and fresh ingredients. Cantonese dishes are often steamed, grilled, or stir-fried and served with rice.
  • Szechuan cuisine is famous for its super spicy dishes that use a lot of chili peppers and Szechuan peppercorns. It originated from the Sichuan province and is known for its strong flavors and fiery taste. Szechuan dishes are often served with rice and vegetables.
  • Shandong cuisine is known for its seafood dishes that are prepared in a variety of ways, such as steamed, grilled, or stir-fried. It originated from the Shandong province and is known for its fresh ingredients and delicate flavors.
  • Hunan cuisine is known for its hot and spicy dishes that use a lot of chili peppers and garlic. It originated from the Hunan province and is known for its rich flavors and complex taste. Hunan dishes are often served with rice and vegetables.

Traditional Chinese Dishes

Chinese cuisine has a long history that dates back to ancient times. Some of the most traditional Chinese dishes include:

  • Kung Pao Chicken: This famous dish originated from the Szechuan province and is known for its spicy and sweet taste. It is made with sliced chicken, peanuts, vegetables, and a spicy sauce.
  • Hot and Sour Soup: This soup is a staple in Chinese cuisine and is known for its complex and rich flavors. It is made with vegetables, tofu, and a spicy and sour broth.
  • Fried Rice: This dish is a common way to serve rice in Chinese cuisine. It is made with white rice, vegetables, eggs, and soy sauce.
  • Steamed Dumplings: These small, delicate dumplings are a popular dish in Chinese cuisine. They are filled with meat or vegetables and steamed to perfection.
  • Mapo Tofu: This dish originated from the Szechuan province and is known for its spicy and flavorful taste. It is made with tofu, ground pork, and a spicy sauce.

Cooking Techniques and Utensils

Chinese cuisine uses a variety of cooking techniques and utensils to create its dishes. Some of the most common techniques include:

  • Stir-frying: This technique involves quickly cooking ingredients in a hot wok with oil and stirring them constantly.
  • Grilling: This technique involves cooking ingredients over an open flame or on a grill.
  • Steaming: This technique involves cooking ingredients in a steamer basket over boiling water.
  • Braising: This technique involves cooking ingredients in a flavorful liquid over low heat.

Some of the most common utensils used in Chinese cuisine include:

  • Wok: This is a round-bottomed cooking pan that is used for stir-frying, deep-frying, and steaming.
  • Cleaver: This is a large, heavy knife that is used for chopping and slicing.
  • Bamboo Steamer: This is a basket made of bamboo that is used for steaming dumplings and other dishes.

Staple Ingredients in Chinese Cuisine

Chinese cuisine uses a variety of staple ingredients that dominate its dishes. Some of the most common ingredients include:

  • Rice: This carbohydrate starch is a staple in Chinese cuisine and is often served sticky or steamed.
  • Soy Sauce: This sauce is made from soybeans and is used to add flavor to dishes.
  • Ginger: This root is used to add flavor and spice to dishes.
  • Garlic: This bulb is used to add flavor and spice to dishes.
  • Onions: These vegetables are used to add flavor and texture to dishes.
  • Black Bean Sauce: This sauce is made from fermented black beans and is used to add flavor to dishes.

The Philosophy and Religion Behind Chinese Cuisine

Food plays a significant role in Chinese philosophy and religion. According to ancient Chinese beliefs, the consumption and preparation of food are attached to the nature of the country and the era. The way food is prepared and consumed is said to have a strong influence on the setting, and bad food can ultimately affect one’s face.

The Tradition of Eating in Chinese Culture

In Chinese culture, the tradition of eating is followed with great respect. It is believed that the way food is prepared and served carries a special meaning. For example, the number of dishes served during dinner is usually even, as odd numbers are considered unlucky. The way the dishes are arranged and the way they are passed around the table is also significant.

The Influence of Chinese Philosophy on Food Preparation

Chinese philosophy has a strong influence on the preparation of food. For example, the way food is sliced and diced is described as having a specific character, and the way it is cooked is said to have a long history. The way food is prepared and presented is also influenced by the local language.

The Use of Chopsticks in Chinese Cuisine

Chopsticks are a special tool used in Chinese cuisine. They are dedicated to the hand and are used to create a line between the person and the food. The way chopsticks are held and pronounced is also significant, and different kinds of chopsticks are used depending on the type of food being eaten.

The Importance of Staple Foods in Chinese Cuisine

Staple foods are of great importance in Chinese culture, as they are believed to create a balanced diet that provides positive energy to the body. The Chinese believe that certain foods belong to certain elements, and by eating a balanced diet, they can maintain good health. For example, rice is thought to belong to the water element, and by adding soy sauce or sugar, it can help balance the body’s scales.

The Different Types of Staple Foods

There are many different types of staple foods in Chinese cuisine, and they vary depending on the area. Some of the most popular staple foods include:

  • Rice: This is the most common staple food in China and is usually steamed and served with other dishes.
  • Noodles: These can be found in different shapes and sizes and are generally served in a hot dish.
  • Dumplings: These are small, solid dishes that are filled with meat or vegetables and are considered a special dish.
  • Steamed buns: These are a type of bread that is steamed and is usually served with meat or vegetables.

The Nutritional Value of Staple Foods

Staple foods in Chinese cuisine are generally considered to be healthy and nutritious. They contain a good balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates, and are often served with fresh vegetables. However, there are some differences between staple foods in different areas of China. For example:

  • In the north, staple foods are generally heavier and include more meat and wheat-based dishes.
  • In the south, staple foods are generally lighter and include more rice-based dishes.

The Cooking Techniques Used for Staple Foods

Staple foods in Chinese cuisine are cooked using traditional techniques that have been used for thousands of years. Some of the most common techniques include:

  • Stir-frying: This is a quick and easy way to cook vegetables and meat.
  • Braising: This is a slow-cooking technique that is used to cook meat until it is tender.
  • Thickening: This is a technique that is used to create a thick sauce for meat or vegetables.

The Role of Meat in Staple Foods

Meat is not considered to be a primary staple food in Chinese cuisine, but it is still an important part of many dishes. Pork is the most commonly used meat in Chinese cuisine, and it is generally sold fresh and young. However, there are also many vegetarian dishes that are considered to be staple foods.

Chinese Cuisine: A Global Influence

Chinese cuisine has spread far beyond the borders of China, becoming a popular style of cooking in many countries around the world. Here are some of the ways that Chinese cuisine has been adapted and modified in different regions:

  • American Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is known for its sweet and sour sauce and dishes like General Tso’s chicken and egg rolls. It is commonly found in fast food restaurants and is heavily influenced by Cantonese cuisine.
  • Japanese Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is similar to American Chinese cuisine but with a greater influence from Japanese tastes. It is commonly found in local restaurants and fast food chains.
  • Korean Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is known for dishes like tangsuyuk (sweet and sour pork) and jjajangmyeon (black bean sauce noodles). It is based on Shandong cuisine and has evolved to suit Korean tastes.
  • Filipino Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is known for dishes like chop suey and pancit (noodle dishes). It is heavily influenced by Cantonese cuisine and has been adapted to suit Filipino tastes.
  • Cambodian, Singaporean, Thai, and Vietnamese Chinese cuisine: These styles of Chinese food have been heavily influenced by the local cuisines of each country and often incorporate ingredients and cooking techniques from those cuisines.

Chinese Fusion Cuisine

Chinese cuisine has also inspired a number of fusion cuisines around the world, including:

  • Hawaiian Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is known for dishes like pineapple chicken and sweet and sour spare ribs. It has been adapted to suit Hawaiian tastes and often incorporates local ingredients.
  • Pizza Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is known for dishes like egg foo young pizza and beef and ginger pizza. It has been developed by Chinese immigrants in the United States and is primarily based on Cantonese cuisine.
  • Ramen Chinese cuisine: This style of Chinese food is known for dishes like tantanmen (spicy sesame ramen) and miso ramen. It is derived from the Chinese dish dandan noodles and has been heavily modified to suit Japanese tastes.

Chinese Cuisine in the International Food Scene

Chinese cuisine receives enormous preference in the international food scene. According to a report released by the food delivery service Grubhub, Chinese food is the second most popular cuisine in the United States, followed by American and Italian cuisine. Chinese cuisine has also spread to other parts of the world, becoming a deep-rooted national cuisine in countries like Singapore and Thailand. The historical influence of the Silk Road and the immigrant communities that hails from the Guangdong region and Hong Kong have resulted in the spread of Chinese cuisine in various forms. The popularity of Chinese cuisine has also led to the development of fusion cuisines that combine Chinese cooking techniques and ingredients with those of other cuisines.

Chinese Dining Etiquette: A Guide to Eating Like a Local

When it comes to Chinese cuisine, the food is not the only important aspect of the dining experience. Dining etiquette plays a prominent role in Chinese culture, and it is important to understand the customs and traditions that come with it. In this section, we will guide you through the basic dining etiquette that you need to know before your next trip to a Chinese restaurant.

Seating and Toasting

  • The host usually proposes a toast at the beginning of the meal, and it is polite to reciprocate.
  • The guest of honor is usually seated at the center of the table, with the highest-ranking person sitting to their right.
  • The seating arrangement is normally rectangular or round, with a large table in the center.
  • It is customary to wait for the host to sit down before taking your seat.
  • When toasting, it is important to hold your glass with both hands as a sign of respect.
  • It is also polite to stand up when proposing a toast.

Table Manners

  • Do not start eating until the host or the most senior person at the table begins.
  • It is normal to use chopsticks to pick up food from a shared plate or bowl.
  • Do not pick through the food to find the best pieces, and do not take too much food at once.
  • It is polite to try all the dishes that are served.
  • Do not leave any food on your plate, as this is seen as wasteful.
  • Swallow your food before speaking, and do not talk with food in your mouth.
  • Do not push your plate away when you are finished eating, as this is seen as impolite.

Service and Payment

  • Service is a prominent part of the dining experience in China, and it is customary to leave a small tip.
  • The bill is normally attached to the tablecloth, and payment is made at the front of the restaurant.
  • It is polite to offer to pay, but the host will usually insist on paying.
  • If you want to pay, you can say “wo qing zuo dian” (I’ll pay the bill).
  • It is important to note that it is considered impolite to discuss the bill or the cost of the meal.

Conclusion

So that’s Chinese cuisine- a delicious mix of flavors from all over the country. It’s a way of life, a culture, and a way to celebrate special occasions with family. It’s a cuisine that’s influenced many other cultures around the world, and one that will continue to do so for years to come.

Check out our new cookbook

Bitemybun's family recipes with complete meal planner and recipe guide.

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Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.