Pinoy omelet recipe (Ham and cheese Filipino omelet)

by Joost Nusselder | Updated:  September 19, 2022

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Breakfast is meant to be the most important meal of the day. But because time is often limited in the mornings, we tend to stick to dishes that are familiar and fast to prepare, so we end up making the same thing day after day.

Are you tired of preparing and eating the same old, tired breakfast dishes? Looking for something that’s simple and quick to prepare, but will inject some new flavors into the ordinary old omelet or scrambled eggs?

Then we have just the recipe for you! The Pinoy omelet takes no time to prepare, and the Filipino touch adds a completely different twist to an otherwise ordinary dish.

Filipino Pinoy Omelet
Favorite Asian Recipes
Favorite Asian Recipes

It’s healthy and delicious, and ready to eat in under 10 minutes. It’s everything you want from a breakfast dish!

Once cooked, it’s traditional to serve the Pinoy omelet with a popular Filipino bun called pandesal, and soy sauce as a side dip, or with garlic rice and banana ketchup on the side.

A complete meal to start the day, ready in no time. Give it a try, as breakfast will never taste the same again!

Pinoy Omelet Recipe (Ham and Cheese)

Pinoy omelet recipe (Ham and cheese Filipino omelet)

Joost Nusselder
A usual sight for Filipino breakfasts, the pinoy omelet recipe is a simple dish that lends itself to being cooked quickly.
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Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Filipino
Servings 3 people
Calories 50 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 6 large eggs
  • tbsp milk (25 milliliters)
  • 1 tbsp flat-leaf parsley leaves chopped
  • Small pinch mustard powder
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Handful leftover or packaged cooked ham chopped
  • Handful mature Cheddar cheese grated or cubed
  • Generous tablespoon unsalted butter (about 1/2 ounce)

Instructions
 

  • Crack the eggs into a bowl and beat them really well. Then add the milk, parsley, and mustard powder. Season with salt and pepper, and mix well. Throw in the ham and Cheddar.
    Omelet eggs in a bowl with parsley and mustard powder
  • Heat the butter in an ovenproof skillet over fairly high heat until it’s fully melted and the pan is very hot. Pour in the egg mixture, pushing the egg away from the sides of the pan using a heatproof spatula. Immediately turn the heat down to medium and let the omelet cook slowly until the bottom half of the omelet is set (about 3 minutes).
  • If you want to fold your omelet, use the spatula to flip 1 side of the omelet over the other to form a half-circle and continue to cook until the omelet is set (about 3 minutes more). If you want to leave your omelet flat, slide the skillet under a preheated broiler or in the oven under the grill setting until the top of the omelet is set (about 3 minutes).
    Folded Omelet
  • Once the omelet is cooked, serve it immediately, whether folded or flat.
    Pinoy Omelet Recipe (Ham and Cheese)

Nutrition

Calories: 50kcal
Keyword Omelette
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Pinoy omelet recipe: The basics

The basic ingredients in this Pinoy omelet recipe are eggs, tomato, and onion.

  • First, heat the pan and put cooking oil into it. Saute garlic and a little onion with the tomatoes until shiny.
  • Then add the beaten eggs, making sure that the beaten eggs cover all of the tomatoes and onions.
  • Let it cook for 2 minutes. Then, flip it over to cook the uncooked side. To do this, make sure that the entirety of the spatula is under the cooked egg omelet so that you’ll be able to flip it properly.
  • After flipping it, let the uncooked part cook for another 3 minutes.
Omelet on a pandesal bread

And that’s it! Enjoy this simple but protein-rich dish with soy sauce as a side-dip or as a partner for rice and with coffee as the beverage.

If you’re feeling that you need to be on the go though, you can put this slab of Pinoy omelet into your pandesal for a quick breakfast.

* If you like Asian food, I’ve made some great videos with recipes and explanations on YouTube you’d probably enjoy:
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Cooking tips

There are 4 critical things you need to check before cooking your omelet:

  1. Have a non-stick frying pan
  2. Make sure the pan is the right size
  3. Have a non-stick spatula to fold the omelet (if that’s your preferred option)
  4. Have a plate that’s big enough to hold a full omelet if you’re going for the flipped version instead

As with any kind of omelet, it’s best to use a non-stick frying pan. This makes flipping and turning the omelet so much easier.

Also, consider the size of your frying pan. If the pan is too big, the omelet will cook too quickly and if it’s too small, it may only cook on the outside and have a runny center.

If you want to fold your omelet, use the spatula to flip one half of the omelet over the other to form a half-circle. Continue to cook until the omelet is set (about 3 minutes more).

If you want to flip the omelet, an easy trick is to place a wide plate on top of the pan and turn the pan over while sliding the omelet onto the plate. Place the pan back onto the stove and gently push the omelet back into the pan.

Don’t stir the egg mixture while it’s in the pan. Otherwise, you’ll end up making scrambled eggs instead!

Remember: Omelets are best eaten as soon as they’re cooked.

Substitutes and variations

Some recipes add ground beef and vegetables; this known as a Filipino tortang. It’s then cooked more like a pancake or frittata.

You also get a tortang giniling, tortang talong, and tortang dulong.

  • Tortang giniling is a Filipino ground beef omelet. It’s made more like a fritter and is filled with lots of ground beef and vegetables.
  • Tortang talong is a Filipino eggplant omelet often served with rice, greens, and soy sauce.
  • Tortang dulong is a Filipino fish omelet made with silverfish, tomatoes, and onions.

Other variations include omelets with sardines or tuna flakes. And for a vegetarian omelet option, spinach and red bell peppers are also popular.

All of these variations on the Pinoy omelet are cooked in the same way as the original. Just add your favorite ingredients, and serve!

How to serve and eat

The omelet and its numerous variations are usually served as a breakfast dish because it’s so quick and easy to prepare. Plus, it’s both filling and nutritious.

It’s traditional to serve the omelet with a popular Filipino bun called pandesal, and soy sauce as a side dip.

Alternatively, it’s served with garlic fried rice and banana ketchup on the side.

Pinoy ham & Cheese Omelet

FAQs

What is Filipino food influenced by?

Filipino food combines Eastern and Western ideas. It’s strongly influenced by Chinese, Spanish, and American traditions.

What is the staple food of the Philippines?

Rice is the staple food. No Filipino meal is complete without rice, and it’s eaten at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

There are over 300 varieties of rice in the Philippines.

What’s the difference between a Pinoy omelet and a Spanish omelet?

While both require eggs as the main ingredient, Spanish omelets also contain potatoes and onions. That’s why they’re also known as tortilla de patatas.

What are the 4 most common types of omelets?

There are 4 main types of omelets.

A French omelet is just made of the most basic ingredients and eggs, and doesn’t contain any filling inside the fold. Peppers, mushrooms, or bacon can be added to the egg mixture before frying.

American omelets are similar to French omelets, except the fillings aren’t added to the egg mixture; they’re added once the egg mixture’s started cooking. They’re either folded or rolled up once cooked.

Pinoy Omelet Ingredients

A frittata is an Italian-style omelet, also featuring eggs as the main ingredient. Vegetables, herbs, and meat are added to the egg mixture, poured into an oven-proof pan, and fried. It’s finished off in a hot oven and is never folded or flipped.

A soufflé is a French egg dish that requires separated egg yolks and egg whites. They’re beaten in different bowls, then combined together with cheese and herbs. This mixture is poured into a hot pan with a lid on top, and cooked.

How can I tell if my eggs are fresh?

The best way to tell if your eggs are fresh is to put them in a bowl of cold water. If they sink, they’re fresh and good to eat. If they float, they should be thrown away.

What’s the difference between an omelet and scrambled eggs?

While both require the eggs to be beaten before cooking, once in the pan, you shouldn’t stir the egg mixture if you’re making an omelet. If you’re making scrambled eggs, you should continue to stir the egg mixture while it cooks in your pan.

What are the most common Filipino flavors?

While Filipino foods often include a little chili, the food isn’t overly hot. It offers a good balance of salty, sweet, and sour, thanks to ingredients like garlic, ginger, and tamarind.

Lemongrass and paprika are also commonly used.

Whip up a quick Pinoy omelet

Now you’re ready to take breakfast to a whole new level by infusing new flavors into the traditional egg-based dishes! Enjoy a great new start to your day and serve your family some quick Pinoy omelets that’ll have their taste buds impressed.

Check out our new cookbook

Bitemybun's family recipes with complete meal planner and recipe guide.

Try it out for free with Kindle Unlimited:

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Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.