Sinampalukang Kambing Recipe (goat meat stew)

                by Joost Nusselder | Updated:  June 5, 2021

3 easy recipes anyone can make...

All the tips you'll need to get started in Japanese cooking with our first email the FREE Japanese with ease quick-start recipe guide

We'll only use your email address for our newsletter and respect your privacy

I love creating free content full of tips for my readers, you. I don't accept paid sponsorships, my opinion is my own, but if you find my recommendations helpful and you end up buying something you like through one of my links, I could earn a commission at no extra cost to you. Learn more

There is much to be admired in Ilocano cuisine in that even if Ilocano dishes are humble and straightforward, many people in the Philippines adapt and cook these Ilocano dishes.

Some Ilocano dishes known to many Filipinos include Igado, Ilocano Papaitan Kambing, Pinakbet, and Dinengdeng.

Another one of these beloved dishes is Ilocandia’s Sinampalukang Kambing recipe.

Sinampalukang Kambing Recipe

It is often said that a region’s recipe is representative of the way of living of that particular region. This is true in the case of the sinampalukang kambing recipe.

x
Favorite Asian Recipes video

Due to the notoriety of the Ilocanos as frugal people, it is not surprising that everything in an animal, in this case, the Kambing or goat, is used and cooked.

The Ilocanos have a separate recipe for each separate body part. They have a recipe for the goat brain, a recipe for the goat innards, a recipe for the skin, and a recipe for the head and feet.

Nothing is ever put into waste with these people.

Sinampalukang Kambing Recipe Preparation & Tip

For this dish, however, the Sinampalukang Kambing recipe makes use of the head and the feet of the goat.

In barrio celebrations, it is common that the goat’s hair is burnt over the fire with all of the other parts cut up and prepared into different dishes.

However, if you are in the city, you can always buy goat’s head and feet in the town wet market or supermarket. Just ask the butcher to cut up these parts for easy cooking.

It is also recommended that you put the head and the feet of the goat on a pot of boiling water with lots of pepper and ginger to fight off the very strong odor of goat meat.

 

Sinampalukang Kambing

Sinampalukang Kambing

Sinampalukang kambing recipe

Joost Nusselder
For this dish, however, the Sinampalukang Kambing recipe makes use of the head and the feet of the goat. In barrio celebrations, it is common that the goat’s hair is burnt over the fire with all of the other parts cut up and prepared into different dishes.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 2 hrs
Total Time 2 hrs 20 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Filipino
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

  • 1 kg goat meat (leg portion) cut in chunks
  • 2 tbsp tamarind powder
  • 1 large onion quartered
  • 5 cloves garlic chopped
  • 2 thumb-sized ginger julienned
  • 2 tbsp oil for sautéing
  • Salt for seasoning
  • 8 cups water

Instructions
 

  • In a casserole saute garlic, ginger, and onion.
  • Add goat meat and stir-fry for one minute.
  • Put water enough to cover the meat. Let it simmer for 1 hour or until meat is tender.
  • Add tamarind powder one tablespoon at a time, mix well and make a taste test. Add more tamarind powder to your preferred sourness.
  • Add salt to taste.
  • Always serve hot.

Notes

If you prefer to make use of tamarind broth from fresh fruit, get at least ¼ kilo of unripe tamarind.
In a casserole, boil 5 cups of water with the tamarind fruit in it.
Continue cooking until tamarind becomes soft.
Pierce the tamarind to bring out further its juice.
Filter the broth and discard the tamarind fruit.
Do procedure 1-6 skipping procedure 4. But this time, add broth with water enough to cover the meat.
Keyword Goat
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Kambing Sinampalukan

After doing this, the Sinampalukang Kambing recipe becomes pretty much your usual one-pot meal. Another important ingredient in this dish is the unripened tamarind broth.

Though you can buy a tamarind broth mix from the supermarket.

It is highly recommended that you use actual unripened tamarind broth as the added sourness brought about its being unripened will mask the gamey aroma of the goat even more.

Add with long green chilies and fish sauce and you’re done.

This is usually partnered either with heaps of rice (especially if it is more on the brothy side) or with beer as a side dish for any beer party.

Every month new cooking tips in your email?

Japanese recipes, cooking tips and more with the first email our FREE mini-recipe guide "Japanese with ease"

 

Also check out this Papaitan Kambing Recipe, Goat’s tripe from the Ilocos region

Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.