Pinakbet with bagoong shrimp paste: an easy 40 minute recipe

                by Joost Nusselder | Updated:  February 13, 2022

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Pinakbet (also called “pakbet”) is a very popular vegetable dish. This is a medley of vegetables that are locally grown in Filipinos’ backyards.

It’s cooked by sauteing vegetables and then flavored with bagoong alamang or fermented shrimp paste and some fish sauce or patis.

It’s sometimes topped and garnished with crumbled pork crackling or chicharon or bagnet.
Pinakbet Recipe

Pinakbet recipe and preparation tip

The traditional pinakbet recipe used round small or baby eggplants, which are green in color and not violet. It also has small “lady finger” (or okra) and mini rounded ampalaya (or bitter gourd).

To hasten the cooking time, the eggplants are cut in half (lengthwise) while the ampalaya is chopped into quarters. Make sure the stem is left intact though!

To retain the deep green color of the vegetables in this pinakbet recipe, the vegetables should be balanced and then shocked in ice-cold water.

Also check out this Pinoy garlic buttered shrimp recipe
Pinakbet recipe and preparation tip
In the Philippines, the Ilocanos are well-known for preparing the best pinakbet.

The versatility of this pinakbet recipe makes it a very good complementary dish to fried foods like pork chops, fried chicken, or even barbequed meats.

In this pinakbet recipe, fresh cherry tomatoes are used instead of the traditional large tomatoes. The cherry tomatoes must be left whole for added visual appeal to the dish.

The Ilocanos also add in bagnet, pork that resembles lechon kawali. This adds to the savory flavor of the pinakbet, aside from the salty and sweetness from the bagoong alamang or fermented shrimp paste.

Pinakbet Recipe

Pinakbet or simply "pakbet" recipe

Joost Nusselder
In the Philippines, the Ilocanos are well-known for preparing the best pinakbet. The versatility of this pinakbet recipe makes it a very good complementary dish to fried foods like pork chops, fried chicken, or even barbequed meats.
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Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 25 mins
Total Time 40 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Filipino
Servings 5 people

Ingredients
  

  • ¼ kilo pork with fat cut into small pieces
  • 2 ampalaya (bitter melons) sliced to bite-sized pieces
  • 2 eggplants sliced to bite-sized pieces
  • 5 pieces okra cut into 2
  • 1 head garlic minced
  • 2 onions diced
  • 5 tomatoes sliced
  • 1 tbsp ginger crushed and sliced
  • 4 tbsp bagoong isda or bagoong alamang
  • 3 tbsp oil
  • cup water
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • In a cooking pan, heat oil and fry the pork until brown. Remove the pork from the pan and set aside.
  • In the same pan, saute garlic, onion, ginger, and tomatoes.
  • In a casserole, boil water and add bagoong.
  • Add the pork in the casserole and mix in the sautéed garlic, onion, ginger, and tomatoes. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
  • Add in all the vegetables and cook until the vegetables are done, being careful not to overcook.
  • Add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Serve hot with plain rice.
Keyword Pork, Vegetable
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Pinakbet
There are also other vegetables present in this dish, like squash or pumpkin. You can also add the fresh and young leaves of the squash plant, as well as its flowers.

Some cooks opt to lessen or omit the bitter gourd or ampalaya in the pinakbet recipe because of the bitter aftertaste.

Ever had trouble finding Japanese recipes that were easy to make?

We now have "cooking Japanese with ease", our full recipe book and video course with step-by-step tutorials on your favorite recipes.

Joost Nusselder, the founder of Bite My Bun is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with Japanese food at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.